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Gynecology

Some women experience worse side effects, like headaches, nausea, depression, soreness, weight gain, strange bleeding… you name it! For this reason, pay close attention to your body after you start taking it. If you notice any changes in your body or your mood, talk to your gynecologist. You may be one of the few women who aren’t suited to taking pills.

Q – Does the pill protect you against sexually transmitted diseases like HIV/Aids?
A – Absolutely not! The pill offers no protection against anything at all except for motherhood, and it doesn’t guarantee 100{37fe965217973254aca47e332e36060a5bf0346a780b2fd96efbc1a37500b41e} protection from that either! The only way to protect you completely from sexually transmitted diseases, including HIV/AIDS, is complete abstinence. So, just don’t ever have sex again, and you’re safe.

Abstinence is not a choice? It is not for the most of the people. There are lots of ways to protect yourself from all the nasty diseases out there. The best place to start is to talk to your local gynecologist. They can recommend methods that will be the most effective in keeping you from catching anything.

Q – If you decide you want to have a baby, how long before the pill stops working?
A – Had enough of the childless life? If you want to start using sex for procreation and not just recreation, you can always stop taking the pill, and you’ll be fertile again.

Time Duration

No gynecologist can give you an exact date. It varies from woman to woman, but most women can ovulate again after 2 weeks. This doesn’t mean that after two weeks BAM!- You’re preggers! Hold on a little bit… it may take a longer time. Many people don’t realize it takes more than once without protection to put a bun in the oven. Have some patience!